Person Recognition in Images with OpenCV & Neo4j

Time for an update on my ongoing person identification in images project; for all the background you can check out these previous posts:

Analyzing AWS Rekognition Accuracy with Neo4j

AWS Rekognition Graph Analysis – Person Label Accuracy

Person Recognition: OpenCV vs. AWS Rekognition

In my earlier serverless series I discussed and provided code for getting images into S3 and processed by AWS Rekognition – including storing the Rekognition label data in DynamoDB.

This post builds on all of those concepts.

In short – I’ve been collecting comparative data on person recognition using AWS Rekognition and OpenCV and storing that data in Neo4j for analysis.

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AWS Rekognition Graph Analysis – Person Label Accuracy

Last week I wrote a post evaluating AWS Rekognition accuracy in finding people in images. The analysis was performed using the Neo4j graph database.

As I noted in the original post – Rekognition is either very confident it has identified a person or not confident at all. This leads to an enormous number of false negatives. Today I looked at the distribution of confidence for the Person label over the last 48 hours.

You be the judge:

rekognition-person-label-confidence-distribution

Check out original post to see how the graph is created and constantly updated as images are created in the serverless IoT processing system.

Analyzing AWS Rekognition Accuracy with Neo4j

As an extension of my series of posts on handling IoT security camera images with a Serverless architecture I’ve extended the capability to integrate AWS Rekognition

Amazon Rekognition is a service that makes it easy to add image analysis to your applications. With Rekognition, you can detect objects, scenes, and faces in images. You can also search and compare faces. Rekognition’s API enables you to quickly add sophisticated deep learning-based visual search and image classification to your applications.

My goal is to identify images that have a person in them to limit the number of images someone has to browse when reviewing the security camera alarms (security cameras detect motion – so often you get images that are just wind motion in bushes, or headlights on a wall).

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