AWS Rekognition Graph Analysis – Person Label Accuracy

Last week I wrote a post evaluating AWS Rekognition accuracy in finding people in images. The analysis was performed using the Neo4j graph database.

As I noted in the original post – Rekognition is either very confident it has identified a person or not confident at all. This leads to an enormous number of false negatives. Today I looked at the distribution of confidence for the Person label over the last 48 hours.

You be the judge:

rekognition-person-label-confidence-distribution

Check out original post to see how the graph is created and constantly updated as images are created in the serverless IoT processing system.

Data is the currency of your Digital Transformation

This is a scary time for a company. But the state of play creates the potential for mass and creative disruption.
— $1 Billion for Dollar Shave Club: Why Every Company Should Worry @ NYTimes

Every company is a digital company. No longer is it a question of if your product will become digital – as was the case with music, newspapers, TV, movies, etc. – it is a question of how the experience of your product (and your company) changes even if your product isn’t digitized.

eCommerce, digital marketing, social, CRM, and content technology and strategies are critical. You will need to invest in those technologies – but underpinning all of those technologies is data – that data is the currency of your digital transformation.

Continue reading “Data is the currency of your Digital Transformation”

Talking Big Data with IBM’s Jeff Jonas

I saw this on TechCrunch earlier today and thought it was an awesome add to my big data series. Jeff Jonas is clearly a big thinker and I agree with almost everything he says. The only thing I take issue with is the recurring theme in this interview that Big Data is primarily about commerce – and specifically ad targeting.

In my next post I’ll be talking about Big Data for One – which I think Jeff hints at but never fully develops.

Part 1: What is Data?

http://player.ooyala.com/player.js?deepLinkEmbedCode=JnZXZyMTpY5njnZyFbtL6owNeHSZaStK&width=630&height=354&embedCode=JnZXZyMTpY5njnZyFbtL6owNeHSZaStK

Part 2: Why data makes us more ignorant.

Data is actually evidence that you already knew, but failed to act on it. Amnesia.

http://player.ooyala.com/player.js?deepLinkEmbedCode=ZzZXZyMTrsb27oUZZDutt7A-TqGdPlXo&width=630&height=354&embedCode=ZzZXZyMTrsb27oUZZDutt7A-TqGdPlXo

Part 3: Why Big Data is the next big thing.

From pixels to pictures… This agrees with my idea of Big Data – it isn’t about the size of the dataset, but about using pieces of data in context by understanding context.

Why he goes to ad based is beyond me however…

http://player.ooyala.com/player.js?deepLinkEmbedCode=s4ZnZyMTrtWTaKSxWF2WEPPXkBtMjZc3&width=630&height=354&embedCode=s4ZnZyMTrtWTaKSxWF2WEPPXkBtMjZc3

Part 4: How data makes us average.

 

Very similar to the points I made here: Living In Public – Facebook, Privacy and Frictionless Distribution
http://player.ooyala.com/player.js?deepLinkEmbedCode=05ZnZyMToC-qRTChMHxO9jsDjOcJFdjo&width=630&height=354&embedCode=05ZnZyMToC-qRTChMHxO9jsDjOcJFdjo

Why the future is irresistible.

http://player.ooyala.com/player.js?deepLinkEmbedCode=JnZnZyMTpU1XeIWbGdtOrD96fWvhbDX6&width=630&height=354&embedCode=JnZnZyMTpU1XeIWbGdtOrD96fWvhbDX6

Let’s Get Serious – Social Media ROI

I’m honestly heartened by the sudden rash of efforts to create a methodology to determine ROI (return on investment) for Social Media efforts. It signals something very important for Social Media – the return of rationality to the debate.

head scratch.pngWhen you consider that a few short months ago the prevailing meme was that creating a basis for your Social Media efforts in terms of ROI was “doing it wrong” – it is impressive how far we’ve come. The realization that moral arguments and scare tactics will only get you so far – and in many cases backfire – has led to an overwhelming need to create an ROI model.

Unfortunately many of these efforts are not really after ROI – they are seeking to justify an already formed point of view.

The reality is we simply don’t know if Social Media has a analytical, fact based ROI. That may sound odd coming from a guy who has bet his personal savings starting a Social Media Engagement and Analytics company – so let me explain both why the ROI hasn’t been proven and why I’m betting it will be.

Social Media is a Niche Opportunity – Today

If you want to know why there is no fact based proven ROI for Social Media investments today, all you need to understand is that Social Media has been adopted in niches. It may be in the Marketing department, or used by your Digital Agency, or perhaps in your Customer Service department. Each of these adoptions was driven out of fear (we have to monitor this and deal with the negative) or the moral (we love our customers – so we are going to do this). The investment was negligible – and in most cases I’d bet it was funded right out of the operating budget of the organization where it was used.

These organizations are beginning to declare victory and are being challenged to prove it. This presents unique challenges, because Social Media runs on anecdotes, not analysis. Dell sells 3 million in product from Dell Outlet after offering those products on Twitter. That is a great anecdote – but it isn’t analysis. When you ask the critical questions:

  • What would you have sold without Twitter?
  • Was that a 3MM increase in sales – or just 3MM net sales from those links?
  • How much did it cost to generate the 3MM in sales and how does that compare to email?
  • Is this repeatable – can it be replicated in other parts of the business – and how do you know?

you quickly find that the anecdote doesn’t equate to ROI. It might… but it isn’t there yet.

These types of anecdotes are justifications. They are about proving the correctness of an already made assumption.

I’ve seen this movie before – it exactly parallels the pattern for CRM in the late 1990’s.

technology-adoption-enterprise.png

NOTE: For simplicity I’ve omitted the case where a technology/methodology has a niche ROI without broader adoption.

We are squarely in the middle of the justification phase for Social Media. This roughly corresponds to the height of the expectations (the big peak on the Gartner Magic Quadrant) and always directly precedes the Trough of Disillusionment. This is a recognizable and predictable pattern for adoption of new technologies and methodologies – and here is why.

The initial opportunity is too good to stay on the sidelines for some early adopter group. They – almost always within existing operating budgets and using the promise as a bulwark defense – adopt the technology/methodology. Once they believe they have seen tangible results they attempt to socialize the “win” outside the organization by creating justifications for what they’ve already done. These justifications bring broader scrutiny.

That scrutiny happens in two phases:

  1. Was it worth it?
  2. Can it be done systemically – can I forecast a x% increase in metric z if I do this again.

The second is ROI. A systemic way of proving that adoption generates a return. If, and only if, that can be proven will the technology escape the niche application and be applied on a broad scale.

Why does it work this way – because enterprises are first and foremost risk management systems. They systemically avoid large risks.

Why Will Social Media Attain Broad Adoption

The primary reasons I believe Social Media will in fact generate a valid ROI and attain broad adoption:

  1. It is measurable.
  2. The unrecognized value far exceeds the recognized value.

Measurability

As you might imagine, it is very difficult to justify and create a systemic ROI for something that is exceptionally difficult to measure. Social Media is – in contrast – eminently measurable. Rational decisions must be made about what to measure – and we need more focus on connecting those measures to the core business metrics – but there is no fundamental barrier to creating valuable measures.

The Value Proposition

Today, we’ve put all our Social Media eggs in the PR/Marketing basket. Even the small amount of credibility given to customer service via Social Media has been driven by the (C-Level Down) idea that customer service should “avert disasters” by monitoring Social Media and addressing customer issues. Make no mistake, this is customer service acting in a PR role – the goal isn’t to provide service so much as to avoid negative perceptions.

However, if you take one large step back and think about the opportunity Social Media presents – you can quickly see that the value proposition is in having a huge, open back channel to your market. We’ve had channels to our customers, and sometimes even our prospects – but this is bigger. It is the entire market for your product or service. You get to listen in on what they have to say about what they want and need. You can engage them to better understand their motivations. You can apply what you learn to create incremental improvements in every phase of your business.

Yes, you can send out special offers. Yes, you can address customer concerns. But the real return will come from having a robust back channel with your entire market; and the resulting market intelligence can – if you apply it – help you make every part of your business more appealing to your target market.

So let’s get serious about ROI. Let’s talk about how companies operate and win by continually tuning their processes to better address the needs of their target market. Let’s talk about how Social Media provides them a back channel to that market, a back channel that is an invaluable source of intelligence about the market.

Let’s talk about how a business that applies the intelligence gained via Social Media to all of their decision making processes is faster and more agile in addressing the needs of their market – and thereby wins market share.


Open Push Email

email-broadcast.pngPeople are obsessed with making their email “broadcast”. Push email is a big deal… but sadly it means you have to lock yourself into a single email service from a single provider. You want near real-time push email… Blackberry or Exchange… or you can pretty much forget about it.

So, why can’t we have an open alternative?

There are a multitude of ways to get real time notifications of new emails, and there is no reason for that mechanism to be an integral part of the email solution itself. Given that I set out to make a push email solution for my Google Apps accounts that would effectively notify on my iPhone or any other device.

As it turns out the solution is actually very simple. I created a simple server process that checks my inbox every few seconds and sends me an Instant Message (IM) when I have a new email. I also incorporated sender and subject filters – so you can get notified only for the emails you want.

I could have made it send me a Twitter DM, or an SMS, or plugged it in to PubSubHubBub, or RSS Cloud…

The point is, the actual mechanism for the notification isn’t really all that important…

More after the jump…

Continue reading “Open Push Email”

I LOVE Statistics – What is Great on Twitter? Apparently Watchmen…

I was poking around in the data coming back from What is Great On Twitter – because, well I’m a geek and I love statistics. I looked at iPhone vs. Blackberry; Apple vs. Microsoft; and TweetDeck vs. Twhirl.

All very interesting, I assure you. But then I decided to see the buzz about Watchmen – and WOW. I’ll let the results speak for themselves:

There were a total of: 119 mentions of Watchmen on What is Great On Twitter

Tweets after the jump…

Continue reading “I LOVE Statistics – What is Great on Twitter? Apparently Watchmen…”

What Do People Think is Great? A justSignal Experiment

More than any other word “innovator” describes me best. I’m not saying I’m Steve Jobs – I’m just saying I’m constantly fascinated by new, interesting combinations of ideas that add value. This morning – as I watched the Follow Friday Tweets FLY by on the justSignal tracker I began to wonder…

Wouldn’t it be great if I could tap into everything people said was “great” on Twitter. justSignal to the rescue! Here is the justSignal Tracker seeking out everything people Tweet about because it is great.

(I’m not embedding the Tracker here for any number of reasons… but it will live at the link above).

There are three things that make this exceptionally interesting (to me – feel free to suggest your own in the comments).

  1. These are 100% authentic – no gaming of the system. Just real people telling us what they think is “great”.
  2. Watching the Real-Time Tracker is a great (sorry for the pun) way to discover things that you might think are great too.
  3. Being able to collect all these tweets for analysis later is an amazingly rich source of information (mostly because of #1 above)

Just as an example, here is an 100% authentic endorsement of a car repair shop. I have no idea who the Drake Garage is… but @ljpalmer is clearly a fan. I don’t know about you, but I totally trust this endorsement. Why? Because it is a spontaneous, authentic utterance…

is-great-tweet.tiff

I’ll have some more announcements about this experiment over the next few days and weeks. This is a really interesting idea – and further illustrates my point that Twitter Search does not make Twitter a Search Engine. If, however, you can collect the relevant data (for your purpose) you can gain amazing insights.